NBL Players Open Trade in the Middle Season

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Surabaya – It’s laid out three series, opening NBL clubs contestants the opportunity to exchange players (trade) in the middle of the season.

In a press statement received by the editorial detiksport, Wednesday (08/02/2012), PT Detection Basketball Cross (DBL) as the organizer NBVL explained about trade policy in the middle of the season.

Mentioned that each team has the right to exchange a maximum of three players with the system ‘one to one’. Players that can be exchanged is rated 9-17 players in each team. The player rating is based on statistics up to the end of the Series III in Palembang.

According to the Implementing Regulations Flexi NBL Indonesia 2011-2012, this player trade period lasts seven days before the convening Series IV in Denpasar, February 18 to 26.

Each team will use that right must notify the league and all the other teams, before the trade was closed on February 17. If there is no confirmation, the team considered not take advantage of that right.

“Strength in Flexi NBL team this season more evenly. Competition tight. Leveraging trade window could increase the chances of achieving their targets. However, the period is quite short. Hopefully this is not even a blunder,” said Yondang Tubangkit, basketball operations manager DBL Indonesia PT.

Acer Announces Aspire M5 version of Haswell

For those who are watching the development of Acer products, may have never seen or tried Aspire M5 which was launched last year. Welcomed the presence of an Intel Core 4th generation, Acer announced the newest generation Aspire M5 which now comes with the latest Intel processors. Besides the processor, there is also some improvement in various other sectors.
acer m5 1 Acer Announces Aspire M5 version notebooklaptop computer news Haswell
Acer Announces Aspire M5 version of Haswell

Acer Announces Aspire M5 version notebooklaptop news Haswell computer Acer Announces Aspire M5 version notebooklaptop computer news Haswell
Acer Aspire M5 is equipped with an Intel Core i5-4200U, 8GB of RAM and 500GB hard disk. In terms of design, nothing has changed. Acer Aspire M5 latest version still appears with silver-colored aluminum body and stylish minimalist look with a touch screen measuring 15.6-inch HD.
In addition to upgrading the processor sector, the latest Acer Aspire M5 also features WiDi (Wireless Display) from Intel. With this feature, users can more easily to share the laptop screen to the TV only via a WiFi connection. Intel’s WiDi technology is not new, but not many laptops on the market today are equipped with Intel’s WiDi. Another improvement in the sector propagate speaker. Acer Aspire M5 presented with new speakers and a powerful 2-watt has been supported by Dolby Home Theater v4 technology for better sound results.
Acer Asprire M5-583P-6428 has been available in the U.S. market and is priced at U.S. $ 699. For a while there has been no news of when it will be available in Indonesia.

Specialty Coffee – A Vibrant Industry, Or The Future Of Coffee At Crossroads Of Change?

Seattle; the home of Boeing, software giants, grunge music and…specialty coffee. Well, not quite. Contrary to popular belief, while Pearl Jam, Nirvana and Boeing and Oracle do indeed hail from the Pacific Northwest, modern specialty coffee has its roots much further south.

When Alfred Peet died in his sleep a few weeks ago he was a sprightly 87. He passed away peacefully hopefully dreaming of coffee trees laden with ripened cherries. While most people have never heard of him, Peet is widely recognised as being the father of modern “specialty coffee” in the industry. He was a Dutchman who became an American. He had traded tea for Lipton’s in Java, lived in Sumatra, worked in the business in New Zealand before, finally, settling down (somewhat) in the University suburb of Berkeley, California. It was at Berkeley where he founded his roastery in 1966 and Peet’s Coffee was born. Alfred Peet was passionate about coffee. His roasting exploits legendary and his ability to commentate, roast and put out fires simultaneously are famous. His experiences while living in Indonesia had given him an affinity with farmers who grew coffee, as well as a thorough understanding of the origin, the place where coffee was grown. This background, combined with his love of roasting, resulted in a place where coffee was not just a cup of Java, but something exotic, living and with a story.

From Alfred Peet’s inspirational example came many of the coffee cultures that now are household names today in America and around the world- Starbucks being the most famous of these of course. The original founders of Starbucks- Baldwin, Bowker and Ziv Seigel originally leant their roasting trade from Peet, in fact Peet roasted for them in their early years. Many others in the industry in America today also passed through the Peet’s Coffee experience. In fact when Howard Schulz purchased Starbucks, Bowker and Baldwin moved across and purchased Peets Coffee- Alfred Peet retiring to a role of Coffee Mentor for the Industry as a whole.

Today most coffee drinkers, from Surabaya to San Francisco, recognise Starbucks and its logo, but the name “Alfred Peet” often draws draws blank looks.

Specialty Coffee today is at a crossroad- an important junction in deciding which direction coffee will be heading over the next decade. In the last 10 years many new comers have entered the business. It is estimated that the global coffee sector today is valued at over US$80 billion. It is no wonder that with these revenue numbers, the industry attracts a mix of business people with mixed agendas- who often see the potential bottom line rather than education and passion as being the driving force in what they do. Traditionally the specialty coffee industry has been built on the strong foundation of sharing knowledge and experience- with the supposition that by helping each other the industry will be strongly quality focused. However a number of the more recent arrivals in the market are perhaps choosing coffee for the perceived easy profits, rather than for a real passion for coffee or its heritage. As a result many of the traditional methods of exchange are not as effective, or used as frequently as they have been in the past.

Globally Coffee is in a position where consumption is beginning to slow down and opportunities to grow coffee are becoming more difficult to find in the traditional coffee consuming markets- Europe, USA, South America and Oceania. The easy answer if to look at new emerging markets- China, India, Pakistan and Indonesia are prime targets. These countries either have low coffee consumption (Indonesian’s, for instance, consume 500gm per person per year vs. Norway’s 12kg per person per year), or have reasonable consumption, but historically are tea consumers (India). The new markets are also very suggestible to western branding- in many cases the strength of branding has been shown to be more important than the product itself. This presents a number of opportunities to strong western brands and of course new local brands to emerge. However it does not necessarily equate to long-term longevity of specialty coffee in these new frontiers.

In the more mature markets, the patterns of consumption have changed markedly over the last 15-20 years. The traditional, lower quality coffee products such as instants, are being replaced by roast and ground coffee (drips, plungers etc) and of course Espresso Based Drinks (cappuccino, latte, espresso etc). Fresh roasted coffee has many advantages over the instant coffee. It is more flavoursome and more importantly has a greater link back to where it originally came from. This means that customer awareness is also on the increase- bringing into the spotlight the actual paper trail of where the coffee comes from, who picked it, what price the grower get from it etc. To consumers in countries such as New Zealand this is very important- as generally there is a linkage between quality of coffee and the return the farmer or grower gets. The correlation is the better the return to a farmers, the better the coffee will be. Higher returns means more time can be spent in the origin country looking after the crop, pruning, selective harvesting, proper intensive drying and packing/storing the coffee once it is dried.

The role the specialty coffee industry plays in all this is very important. Retail shops that source and supply only the best coffee help to sustain the industry both upstream and downstream. This means the farmers and workers will be rewarded and the consumers will have access to quality coffee, hopefully growing the business further.

Unfortunately the reverse is gradually becoming more often the norm. Cafes, coffee shops and roasters entering the market all over the world tend to look for short-term cost advantages to try and fuel their business models. To achieve this they either buy poor quality coffee, as cheap as possible or average quality coffee…likewise as cheaply as possible. Cheap coffee equates to, at the best, very average finished product. This in turn means generally a poor perception of the place selling the coffee. This would perhaps be OK if there were not so many cafes now selling poor quality coffee. As it is it means that poor quality coffee is often accepted a being the norm- hence having the result of putting people off drinking coffee.

In many ways the industry can be seen as having come almost full circle back to where it was in the early 1970’s when instant coffee and coffee sitting on hotplates for 10 hours were seen and accepted as being normal coffee. This is what pioneers like Peet worked so hard to change. It is also why the crossroads the industry now stands at are so important.

The choices are really quite simple. For coffee to evolve and grow further there needs to be education of the retailer and the customer. The global industry is built around national organisations that play a varying role in providing advice and education to those in retail or wholesale. The Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) and the SCAE (Specialty Coffee Association of Europe) are two such organisations. However to become members of these organisations is as simple as filling out a form and paying a fee. Often the motivation of the people joining is just to get a sticker to put on their shop door, knowledge is a secondary motivator. There is talk that membership should involve some form of basic enter test and then continuing education via the internet- which would at least help to provide tools to pass information on to those drinking the coffee.

Looking at those in the industry who do things well, is also a great way of building and planning the future for specialty coffee. In the USA quality roasters and café operators such as Allegro, Blackstump Coffee and Intelligensia have taken industry standards to a new level. Buying quality coffee, hiring quality staff and imparting quality knowledge to customers buying their morning coffee has proven very successful for these companies. So much so that it is an unquestionable part of their corporate culture. All of these companies also practice something unique- they regularly visit their growers in countries such as Indonesia, Guatemala, Kenya, Brazil and Colombia. To take this one step further, they do not just visit and spend a few nights- taking photos of a grower’s coffee trees, they maintain regular contact with those growing the coffee. This approach must be seen as the future for coffee in competitive, quality driven markets. It is true relationship coffee where the roaster becomes by default part of the farmers extended family.

Passing knowledge on to those who buy a coffee everyday, and arming them with information on what type of coffee they drink, how it is grown, who grows it, when it is picked, how it gets to them gives all power to the customer. It is a very important, yet lagging piece of the future of coffee globally. Being able to learn the differences in tastes/cupping qualities has some snob quality, but more importantly it helps the buyer to differentiate between good, average and poor coffee. Here lies the problem. A successful café founded on the principles of sustainability and true coffee culture has nothing to fear from education. A café selling poor quality coffee is unlikely, or perhaps unable, to want to educate clients about quality.

A failure to address quality, education and sustainability in the business sector (from the farmer to the retail customer) will ultimately result in consumption patterns falling further. Quality issues- especially over the counter and in the cup, need to be addressed. If not unfortunately those to suffer will be the grower or origin country, rather than the retailer. With current economics a grower in Indonesia receives only around 2-5% of the cost of the average cup sold in America or Europe. If demand drops off, the Arabica business ultimately will fall back into a cycle of commodity pricing rather than specialty pricing that many quality origins now enjoy. Competition from other beverages, and lifestyle choices, compete with the disposable income that coffee comes from.

If Alfred Peet was still alive, undoubtedly he would just carry on doing what he did well and loved, roasting coffee and sharing his knowledge and experience with anyone willing, and wanting to learn and listen- a model to all of us in the industry today.

© Alun H.G Evans, Merdeka Coffee, 2007. The writer reserves all moral rights to this article. May only be reproduced.

Again Win Over Dragons, Warriors now 2-0

Jakarta – Indonesia Warriors beat Westports Malaysia Dragons back in the second game of the play-offs ASEAN Basketball League (ABL). Warrios won by a score of 77-65, they are now 2-0.

Competing in front of supporters in Mahaka Square, Sunday (05/26/2013) evening local time, the Warriors get fierce opposition from the Dragons. John Todd Purves’s side just edged it 16-15 when the first quarter ended.

In the next 12 minutes, the Warriors failed to tighten defense. As a result, they conceded 20 points and only 18 points entering.

Time lags 34-35 in the second half of the game began, the Warriors were able to perform well. They managed to pack 19 points and holding the Dragons collection points when the third quarter ended.

In the final quarter, the Warriors were able to perform very well with 24 points while adding nicely to the Dragons defense only collected 14 points. The match ended with a score of 77-65.

Shown as a top performer in the game is a power guard Warriors, Stanley Pringle, with 21 points and six rebounds.

With this result, the Warriors STAYED need one more victory to qualify for the final round. The next match will take place at home to the Dragons, Maba Stadium on May 29.

This is 7 Oil and Gas Company Reaches Oil Production Target

Jakarta – Special Unit Managing Upstream Oil and Gas (Migas SKK) recorded as many as 7 Contractors Cooperation Contract (PSC) oil production surpassed the target of state budget 2013.

PSC’s seventh among others:

ConocoPhillips Indonesia Ltd managed to achieve oil production by an average of 34 867 barrels per day from the target in the state budget in 2013 amounted to 32 890,
Vico Indonesia managed to produce as much as 13,740 barrels of oil per day from the target of 13 010 barrels per day,
Medco E & P Indonesia (S & C Sumatra) managed to produce 6,841 barrels of oil per day from the target of 6,630 barrels per day,
PHE ONWJ managed to produce 38 996 barrels of oil per day from the target of 38 080 barrels per day,
Chevron Pacific Indonesia managed to produce 323 014 barrels of oil per day from the target of 319 430 barrels per day
Medco E & P Indonesia (Rimau) managed to produce 14,086 barrels of oil per day from the target of 14,060 barrels per day
ConocoPhillips (Grissik) Ltd managed to produce 9,435 barrels of oil per day from its target of 9,430 barrels per day.

Head of Oil and Gas SKK Rudi Rubiandini said the PSC is still not able to meet the target set in the state budget-2013 as well as targets in the Work Programme and Budget (WP & B) in 2013, then the PSC are immediately improve their performance in order to meet the targets set.

“Performance targets are not reached so soon improved to the national oil production target could also be exceeded. What we are doing right now is working for the State, for the national interest because it lets us collaborate and work together,” Rudi said in a written statement, Wednesday (7/31/2013)

He said a number of non-technical constraints such as the licensing process in local government, including the issue of sealing oil wells crude oil theft is still a major persolaan in an effort to increase national oil production.

Rudi hope the Regents participate and support efforts to increase domestic oil production in order to improve the welfare of the people in Indonesia.

“State revenue from oil and gas are not only enjoyed by the people in the oil and gas producing areas but also enjoyed by the public at the end of the island in the archipelago that has no oil. Due to direct oil and gas revenues into the State account and straight into the oil and gas revenues in the state budget enjoyed by the whole people Indonesia from Sabang to Merauke, “he said.

He also said the state’s revenues from the management of upstream oil and gas in the first half of this year reached U.S. $ 18.7 billion from the target set by U.S. $ 18.4 billion for the first half of the year.

While oil production in the same period reached an average of 831,118 barrels per day or 99% of the target set in the state budget in 2013 amounted to an average of 840,000 barrels of oil per day.

Indonesian Cement Still Rely Domestic Sales

JAKARTA – PT Semen Indonesia (Persero) Tbk said, most of the company’s revenue in the first semester of 2013 was derived from the domestic market. First half of the company’s revenue reached Rp 10.91 trillion, equivalent to 95.53% of total revenue in the first half of this year.

Dwi Soetjipto, President Director of Semen Indonesia, said that the value of domestic sales increased by 26.42% compared to sales in the same period last year of Rp 8.63 trillion.

Of the domestic market, the composition of the Indonesian Cement revenues derived from customers in Java and outside Java almost equal. Java market contributed revenue of Rp 5.72 trillion or 52.43% of total domestic sales. Meanwhile, consumers outside of Java contribute to the revenue of Rp 5.19 trillion or 47.57% of total domestic sales.

In addition to maintaining dominance in the domestic market, Indonesian Cement continues to boost sales to foreign markets, especially countries in Southeast Asia. From January to June this year, Indonesian Cement has achieved record revenues in foreign markets amounted to Rp 511.64 billion.

“This number jumped nearly 170% compared to overseas sales in the first half of last year is only Rp 30.34 billion,” said Dwi

The Best Coffees in the World

When considering the best coffees in the world, I went to the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) for research. They are the organization that sets the quality standards for specialty coffee, which the public calls “gourmet” coffee. All specialty coffees use arabica beans. The other category of is the robusta bean, which is of inferior taste quality to arabica. Within these categories, there are several varieties of bean. Arabica beans are grown at a higher altitude than robusta.

Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world and is graded in a similar manner as wine. This event is called a “cupping” and has a set of strict standards. Winning a cupping is very prestigious and has a direct effect on the prices a coffee grower can get for his crop.

History of these “cupping” winners has shown that three areas of the world produce the most winners. Interestingly, these regions have a very similar latitude when looking at the world map. The three regions are Ethiopia, Sumatra and Panama.

Ethiopian/Kenyan Coffee (Africa)

Ethiopian coffee is aromatic, highly flavorful, and also known to be some of the best coffees in the world. It is also the origin of all coffee. The Ethiopian people have a legend that says that a goat herder discovered Ethiopian coffee around 850 AD. This legend claims that the goat herder noticed that his sheep were very excited and nearly dancing after eating red berries from a tree. The legend of the founder goes on to say that the herder sampled the red berries for himself and took some of the berries home to his wife who insisted that he take them to the monks. The monks supposedly threw the berries into a fire and noticed the delicious smell that the berries produced. The monks are said to have removed the berries from the fire and boiled the berries in water to create the beverage that we now know as Ethiopian coffee.

Whether this legend is true, or in fact just a legend is forever a mystery. Regardless, Ethiopian coffee has been used for religious ceremonies. These ceremonies are still held today and if a guest is invited to participate in the ceremony, it is well known to be a very beautiful experience.

Locally, Ethiopian coffee is served with either sugar, or in some parts of Ethiopia, salt. Milk or any type of creamer is never used in traditionally brewing. The process of making the coffee varies by region. In some regions it is dry processed and in some other regions it is washed. The Ethiopian coffee found in stores today is dry processed.

The process is often grueling and coupled with with importing adds to the reason of why Ethiopian coffee can be expensive.

When consumers purchase Ethiopian coffee to be brewed at home, it is wise to consider fair trade Ethiopian coffee. The obvious reason to consider fair trade is so that the producers of this wonderful product can reap the benefits of their hard work. Ethiopian coffee has a rich, bold, and exciting history and a taste that has been favored by many people for a long time.

Sumatran Coffee (Indonesia)

Sumatran coffee comes from the island in Indonesia called Sumatra. The taste of Sumatran coffee is spicy, herbal, and very distinct. It is considered to be one of the best coffees in the world and was first introduced by the Dutch around 1699 when the Dutch wanted to keep up with the demand of coffee to Europe. The Dutch traders knew the difference between Sumatran coffee beans and other coffee beans by the appearance, which are irregularly shaped and bright green.

Sumatran coffee is one of the best coffees in the world and has a low acidity which makes it highly favored among other types of coffee. The beans are usually grown in full sunlight and with no chemicals. A highly popular type of Sumatran coffee, yet thoroughly disgusting in many peoples opinion, is the kopi luwak Sumatran coffee. The kopi luwak coffee is coffee beans that have been eaten by the small animal known as a luwak. After the luwak digests and excretes the coffee beans, local villagers collect the excreted beans and roast them. These excreted and roasted beans are said to cost about $300 a pound. Of course, not all of Sumatran coffee comes from the excrement of the luwak. There are many other varieties of Sumatran coffee as well.

Most of the Sumatran coffee beans are processed using the wet and dry processing method. This processing method is another reason why Sumatran coffee is so popular. Most other types of coffee beans are processed by using either a wet method or a dry method, hardly ever both.

When purchasing Sumatran coffee for use at home, a person should try to purchase fair trade Sumatran coffee. Fair trade beans can be found at various online retailers and also at gourmet coffee retailers. This insures that the growers benefit from all of the hard work that they put into growing this delicious coffee.